VISUAL PROCESSING AND FINE MOTOR GAMES

Visual Processing and Fine Motor Games This is a list of educational toys, games, and activities for kids of various ages and abilities. These toys help develop visual processing, visual motor, and fine motor skills.  These games do not replace direct occupational therapy services or appropriate vision care and treatment. Talk to your occupational therapist about which games he/she recommends or how the game may be modified to better suit your child’s needs. Hand-Eye Coordination and Visual-Spatial Skills: Rush Hour Legos Blokus Beading Crafts Jenga Frisbee Perfection Paint by Number Light Bright Suspend Pick Up Sticks Kanoodle Tinker Toys Color Stix Operation Quick Cups Etch-A-Sketch KEVA Brain Builders Yo-Yo Pixie Cubes Jacks Uno Stacko Barrel of Monkeys Color Code Visual Perception/Visual Thinking Games: Spot It Set Raccoon Rumpus Spot It Words Farkle Robot Face Race Sequence Connect Four Zingo Parquetry Blocks I Spy Book iTrax Rubik’s Cube Mastermind BBQ Blitz Imagine That Tri-Ominos Brain Cheeser Race to the Treasure Simon Tangrams Dominoes Pentominoes Color Code Racko Block By Block Where’s Waldo Jig Saw Puzzles Battle Ship Memory Match Fine Motor, Strategic Thinking, Social Skills/Turn Taking, Pre-Academic Skills: Pancake Pile Up Frieda’s Fruit Fiesta Game Pop the Pig Hoot Owl Hoot The Sneaky Snacky Squirrel Velcro Pretend Play Food Shelby’s Snack Shack Smart Snacks Alphapops Avalanche Fruit Salad Frankie’s Food Truck Smart Snacks Numberpops Kid Power Therapy Services, Inc. and its staff have no personal connection or financial interest in the above games. If your child is experiencing problems with their visual motor, fine, or gross motor skills, please schedules a comprehensive evaluation with a pediatric occupational therapist. If your child...

Joint Attention: A Foundation for Language Development

Joint Attention: A Foundation for Language Development What is Joint Attention? Joint attention is the act of a person sharing attention with another person towards a given object or event, and there is understanding between the two people that they are both interested in the same object or event. In order for an individual to demonstrate joint attention, he/she must be able to gain, maintain, and shift their attention. While engaged in joint attention, an individual is able to (non-verbally) communicate to another by using their eyes and looking at an object, and back at the other person. This shared moment not only allows for individuals to communicate, but also fosters development of social skills. When does is start and what does it look like?  Joint attention starts very early in a child’s life and it’s first instances are usually between a child and his/her parent. These moments are when a child and the adult are both shifting their attention and eye sight back and forth from an object to the person. These examples can include pointing to a desired toy/object/food item/bottle, looking at a book together, or reaching out to be picked up. As a child grows into a toddler they should develop more skills such as turn taking during a game or requesting for help getting on a swing. A child can exhibit joint attention by responding or initiating. An example of a response would be if a parent and a child are playing together and the parent says, “Look at the puppy!” The child responds by following the parents gaze and point, and looks at the puppy....

Creating Routines to Drive Relationships and Learning Opportunities

Creating Routines to Drive Relationships and Learning Opportunities By Joyce Ravary, OTR/L School is under way, and most households are quite busy!  The days start early and after school time flies by, and before you know it, it’s off to bed.  One day can roll into the next. Since I am a pediatric occupational therapist, many of the parents I come into contact with on a weekly basis have children with special needs and it takes a unique set of parenting skills and lots of energy (emotional and physical) to meet the daily demands of nurturing their child, and supporting their continued development. I can only imagine how parents must feel as they are pulled in so many directions. So, as the start of the school year is upon you, I would like to encourage all parents, and especially parents of kids with special needs, to think about how routines can create built in opportunities to really connect with your child and additionally, how routines can create many wonderful opportunities for learning. Daily routines are perhaps thought of as just ‘maintenance’ activities: meal time, running errands, taking a bath, getting ready for bed.  But these day to day activities provide rich opportunities for having fun together, and supporting your child in learning new skills, and new levels of responsibility. Here’s some of my thoughts on routines: They provide comfort and a sense of safety from knowing what will happen (this is especially helpful for young children or children who are very disorganized or disregulated). Routines can help limit behavior disruptions because it provides children with a sense of control...

Using Children’s Books to Enhance Language Skills

Using Children’s Books to Enhance Language Skills Reading to children beginning at a very young age is a great way to introduce them to language.  However, enhancing their language can go far beyond reading the book.  Here are some fun, simple ways to use children’s books for more than just reading the words on the page. Select books that are repetitive and have child “fill in the blanks” Example: Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See” By Eric Carle.   Repetition is a great way for children to learn language.  After multiple times reading this book with your child, start pausing in the reading and see if your child can fill in the blanks. Use picture books that don’t have any words. Using picture books you and your child can make up your own story. Take turns adding to the story with each turn of the page. Instead of making up your own story, describe what you see on each page. This can start at the word level with just naming items on the page and eventually expand to sentences describing items on the page. Play a game of “I Spy.” Describe something on the page and see if your child can identify it, then switch roles where he/she describes then you guess. Example: “I Spy something that’s red, is a fruit, crunchy, and grows on trees.” Use traditional nursery rhymes or fairy tales. Nursery rhymes have rhythm to them just like songs….after multiple repetitions start pausing during the rhyme and see if your child can finish the rhyme. You can also act out nursery rhymes using yourself or...

Check back often!

New ideas will be added periodically.  If there is an area that you would like more information about, let us know! kptherapyservices@gmail.com